Tag Archives: Lecture Notes

Throughput vs turnaround time vs waiting time vs response time

Introduction Throughput, turnaround time, response time and waiting time are frequently mentioned terms in operating systems. They may look similar but they refer to different methods for evaluating CPU scheduling algorithms. When multiple processes are running, the CPU has to …

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Memory mapped files in OS

Introduction Today, I am going to talk about memory mapping, a typical topic in operating systems design. I will provide a short summary of memory mapped files in an easy to follow manner. Before we start, I recommend that you …

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Policy vs mechanism in operating system

Introduction This is a commonly asked question in operating systems design. In this post, I am going to provide few examples to clarify the difference between policy and mechanism in OS. Let us first explain what policy and mechanism stand …

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Page table vs inverted page table

Introduction The purpose of this short post is to explain operating system’s page table vs inverted page table, mention their advantages and disadvantages in an easy to follow manner. Many students and beginners do not get the point behind these …

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Python mutex example

Introduction I highly recommend that you check out the following article to get a quick idea about different terms used in operating systems with regard to concurrency, multitasking and threading. Back to our topic, In this short post, I am …

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Difference between paging and segmentation

Introduction Finding differences between two terms may imply that we are aware of what each individual term stands for yet the purpose of comparison is just seeking a better way of understanding. I think that is true to some extent …

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Difference between computer architecture and computer organization

This is a commonly asked question that sadly confuses many computer science students. ┬áConfusion comes from the fact that the literal meaning of the two terms is very close. Also, the historical context of the two terms does not help …

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